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3RARY FACILITY 



Rxerci.ses on the g ogues 
and contractions of Pitman's 
shorthand. 



J.F.G. Grow 




Exercises 

on the 

ammalogues and Contractions 

of 

Pitman's Shorthand 



J. F. C. GROW 






'sir isucPir«w»atQ 







6d. 



LONDON 

PITMAN & Sons, LTD., i AMES CORNER, 

BATH: PHONETIC INSTITUTE 

-&&'$&&&£' Z WEST (JTH STREET 

MELBOURNE: THE RIALTO, COLLLSS STREEr 

TORONTO, CANADA 

The Commercial Tsxt Book Co. 

or 

Ths Cow, Cuuuc Co., Ltd. 



New Haven 
Conn. 



B. fc^ 

DALLAS, i£XAS 



Exercises 

on the 

Grammalogues and Contractions 

of 

Pitman's Shorthand 



J. F. C. GROW DALL *S, TEXAS 




LONDON 

SIR ISAAC PITMAN & SONS, LTD., I AMEN CORNER, E.C. 

BATH: PHONETIC INSTITUTE 

NEW YORK: 2 WEST 45th STREET 

MELBOURNE : THE RIALTO, COLLINS STREET 

TORONTO, CANADA 

The Commercial Text Book Co. 

or 

The Copp, Clark Co., Ltd. 



Printed by Sir Isaac Pitman 

& Sons, Ltd., London, Bath, 

New York and Melbourne 



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CONTENTS 



PAGE 



INTRODUCTION . . . ... . . .V 

: KXERCISES IN TYPE ....... 7 

H 

^ EXERCISES IN SHORTHAND . . . . . .18 

H GRAMMALOGUES PHONETICALLY ARRANGED ... 32 



GRAMMA LOGUES AND CONTRACTIONS ALPHABETICALLY 
III 

£ ARRANGED ........ 34 

i 



449424 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2007 



http://archive.org/details/exercisesongrammOOgrowiala 



INTRODUCTION 

It is admitted by all practical writers of Pitman's Shorthand 
that one of the important factors in the taking and tran- 
scribing of shorthand notes is a perfect knowledge of the logo- 
grams and contractions. The exercises in this volume are 
intended for the purpose of assisting shorthand-writers in this 
direction. 

There are several ways in which the exercises can be used — 

(1) The shorthand forms excellent reading practice, and there 
is no better test of a knowledge of the logograms and contractions 
than the reading of sentences mainly composed of such outlines. 

(2) The type portion may be transcribed into shorthand, and 
the shorthand portion referred to as a key. 

(3) The shorthand may be copied, and such a practice not 
only fixes the logograms and contractions in the mind, but it 
is also a splendid aid to the development of a neat and rapid 
s( jrle of writing. 

(4) Teachers may dictate the exercises, and then students can 
check their efforts by means of the shorthand. With this end 
in view the exercises are marked in divisions of tens. It is 
suggested that this dictation be given at varying rates, and 
especially to speed students. 

(5) A good plan to adopt is as follows — 

(iive the students the letters A from the alphabetically-arranged 
grammalogues and contractions for homework, and the following 



VI INTRODUCTION 

week dictate the sentences under the letter A. Students should 
then read back from their own notes, or check their effort from 
the shorthand. In sixteen weeks, or less where more than one 
meeting weekly, the whole of the grammalogues and contractions 
could be revised with very little effort on the part of the students, 
and without materially interfering with the working of other 
exercises. If necessary, two or more letters could be given at 
a time. 

In all these ways the exercises should do something to over- 
come the weaknesses shown by some shorthand-writers in the 
memorising of the logograms and contractions. 

As a means of memorising the logograms there is no better 
way than taking them phonetically, and for this purpose the 
list of grammalogues, arranged phonetically, should prove of 
great value. The alphabetic lists of grammalogues and con- 
tractions are included for purposes of reference. 



EXERCISES ON THE 
GRAMMALOGUES AND CONTRACTIONS 

A. 

The letters of administration enabled the administrator and 
administratrix to | acknowledge the documents, but the abstrac- 
tion of the administrator after | the acknowledgment of the papers 
led to the abandonment of | the enterprise, and although they 
had all been properly acknowledged | according to law and were of 
advantage some time ago, 1 yet by reason of the above circum- 
stance they were not | able to apply themselves to the task and 
approve subsequent | documents and proceed to administrate. 
They were slow to acknowledge | the position in which they 
found themselves, but they ought I to have looked at the con- 
sequences in the beginning, as | any good business man would 
do. 

The administrative authority was I vested in the adminis- 
trator and administratrix, and when they wished I to secure 
some agricultural land for the purpose of engaging | in the business 
of agriculture they inserted an advertisement in I the paper to 
the effect that they would amalgamate their | interests ; but in 
the course of a few weeks they I were altogether unprepared 
to carry out the amalgamation. This was I antagonistic to the 
other side and the matter was submitted | to arbitration, but 
as they were unable to arbitrate, the I appointment of a receiver 
followed. As he acted in an | arbitrary manner and would not 
listen to anything applicable to | the case, much antagonism 
followed on the part of the I arbitrator and the arbitrament was 
dropped. 

The archbishop was deeply | interested in his work, and when 
the building of the I Church of the Atonement was contemplated, 
he engaged an architect | for the attainment of his object and 
examined many architectural I designs and proceeded with the 
erection of the edifice ; and | although the architect was aristo- 
cratic and the parishioners were of I the aristocracy, yet, to the 
astonishment of the members of I the Church, the expense was too 
great and it was | found necessary to make an assignment which 
certainly was not I auspicious. (311) 

7 



B. 

The religious services were followed by the baptism of many | 
men and women into the Baptist Church, including a few I benev- 
olent persons who desired the minister in his benevolence to | 
baptise them before he baptised other converts who were 
perhaps | of a more benignant nature. The bondsman and the 
bondservant, | although of a more lowly station, made vigorous 
protest with | the residt that the church went into bankruptcy. 
When the I treasurer, on behalf of the congregation proceeded to 
balance his | books, and had balanced about halfway through, 
he could foresee | that the balances would not be sufficient 
because funds had | been abstracted beyond recovery. It was 
also discovered that they I had started to buy too much land, 
but it was | then too late to rectify the mistake. (127) 



G. 

The character of the catholic captain was indicated by the I 
circumstances of his request for a circumstantial certificate to 
the | effect that the celestial cabinet were believers in the 
principles I of Calvinism. One characteristic of the captain 
was that he | was capable, and in a contingency he could be called | 
upon to care for the children, teach a child Christianity, | hit a chair 
with his little finger, engage in commercial | pursuits, cheer the 
downhearted, maintain his opinions in Christian controversy | 
and other controversial questions, conduct a cross-examination, 
cure a cold, I draw up a covenant of warranty, and having cross- 
examined a | witness he could, under most circumstances, instruct 
him so that I he could come to an understanding of the Constitu- 
tion and | live under constitutional law, and he was never known 
to | put the cart, before the horse. (136) 



D. 

Delinquency in business matters is dangerous, and degen- 
eration of trade I is apt to follow if delinquent customers, who 
are deficient | in honour or defective in memory, are permitted 
to contract I debts. It is very dangerous to trust such persons, 
no | matter what denomination they belong to, until they demon- 
strate their I ability to pay. A doctor may trust democratic 



LA 

9 DALLAS, i£XAS 

patients in I the belief that democracy is honourable, and he 
might feel I secure in denominationalism, but until he has had 
a demonstration | during many months of their ability and 
willingness to settle I up, he may pay dear for his confidence. 
If a | postman should deliver a letter and a merchant make 
delivery | of goods, if they are delivered promptly it makes little I 
or no difference how they are delivered ; one is not | different 
from the other. If we have deliverance from bodily I pain, we 
say the doctor has done well, and we I put him down as a skilful 
physician. 

There was an | error in the description of the property and it 
proved | destructive to the transaction. The house was in a 
dilapidated | condition and had depreciated in value. The owner 
had difficulty | in money matters, and although he had always 
carried himself I in a dignified manner and prided himself on his 
dignity, | yet the destruction of his property caused a dethrone- 
ment of | his reason and he died a pauper. 

The employee was I discharged because of his disinterestedness 
which caused much displeasure and | disappointment to his 
parents. His disrespectful manner was disproportionate to | his 
distinguished birth. His opinions were dissimilar to those of | 
his father, who wished his son to distinguish himself, but | the 
doctrine of future punishment had no terrors for him I and he 
went his own way. (286) ' 



The Englishman was an ecclesiastic authority, and was noted 
for | his efficiency in all ecclesiastical questions. He was con- 
sidered the | most efficient clergyman in England, and in every 
important emergency was I found equal to the occasion. Perhaps 
in all English-speaking countries I he equalled the best. He was 
eccentric in his delivery, | and, unlike many ministers, he had 
made a study of | electricity, and in fact had taken out patents 
for electrical | devices. His eye was clear and steady, and he was | 
a bitter foe of all evil. 

The Episcopalian clergyman was I an ^-enthusiastic worker 

and his enthusiasm spread to his parishioners. | He made an 

especial study of social work, resulting in | the entertainment 

and enlightenment of his people, and with the | assistance of 

a— (33) 



10 

James Smith, Esq., who was greatly interestedjjin I church work, 
he was able to establish social clubs and I thus enlarge the church ; 
and the chancel was also enlarged, | and by this enlargement 
and the establishment of these various | services everything was 
brought to a high state of efficiency. I 

It is expected that the expenditure for extemporaneous speakers 
will I prove an expensive proceeding, and may extinguish the 
funds in | the treasury, and if they should be extinguished by 
this | action it would certainly prove an extravagant action. 
The executive | committee, however, which consisted of an execu- 
tor and executrix, doubted | the expediency of this large expen- 
diture, and upon the exchange I of views among the people the 
clergyman exchanged pulpits with | a neighbour and thus the 
large expenditure was avoided. (249) 

F— G— H. 

The falsification of the books by the accountant, who was, I 
of course, familiar with the accounts, involved the bank in | 
financial difficulty last February. This accountant was, of 
course, quickly ( discharged and an assistant whose famili- 
arity with the accounts was | inferior, was obliged to familiarise 
himself. However, from henceforth the I institution will be 
governed on more honest lines, and the I new book-keeper will 
govern himself accordingly. It has generally been | managed 
with the greatest care for a generation, and the I large quantity 
of gold stored in the vaults was under | guard of gentlemen who 
could go on bonds to almost | any amount and had given many 
of their best years I in the service of the institution. Out; gentle- 
man said that | he would give a hundred thousand dollars rather 
than have I the bank fail. Henceforward no fear need be felt. 

However I happy a man may think himself, things might 
happen any I hour, indeed, they have happened to many, to cause 
him | much misery. The man who appeals to high heaven for | 
help has a chance to lead a holy life, but I he must know how to 
keep his house always in I order. (191) 

I. 

I know the identical location of the store, and if I the manager 
wishes good business, he must realise the importance f of immediate 



11 

delivery of his goods, for it is impossible I to make a success 
if he is accustomed to neglect I his business and fails to make 
improvements all the time.$l> It is impracticable to maintain 
an imperturbable position in ar$i impregnable fortress and then 
ekpect people to come forward and | treat you in a cordial 
manner. Rather by indefatigable labour | and courtesy, influence 
customers to come to you and the | improbability of their 
deserting you will be great. 

From information I which I received yesterday I was influenced 
to try incandescent | lamps in my house. The old candles which 
I usw | were incapable of giving me sufficient light, but the incan- 
descence I from the new fight is glorious. The initial cost may I 
be greater, but a man would on that account be I inconsiderate 
to ruin his eyes. Besides, the candles are more | inconvenient 
arid the cost should be incorporated in the annuM | expenses. 

The inscription which was inscribed on the tablet was I inspected 
by a.n. J independent gentleman, and although the inscription 
represented | the deceased to have been an influential member 
of society, | yet upon investigation he was informed that the indi- 
vidual in. | life had proved himself inefficient and far from indis- 
pensable to | his fellows. In fact, his informer stated that his 
influence | was insignificant, and that his insignificance was a 
matter of | general knowledge.^ This information, although con- 
trary to the inscription itsed, I was full of instruction to those 
of his acquaintances wh6* | had always looked upon him as a 
man of characieV. I 

An inspection of the school led to the discovery of | insub- 
ordination on the part of the scholars, and it was I deemed 
necessary to increase the staff, which seemed to be entirely I in- 
sufficient for the insurance of correct behaviour. The intelli- 
gence Sof | the teachers was unquestioned and they could make 
their lessons | intelligible to the intelligent pupils, but the lack of 
interest | on the part of some of the pupils, and the I fact that 
others were insubordinate, led to an investigation by I the 
school authorities who were interested in the matter and | the 
introduction of different methods of instruction. 

The investment made | by the administrator of the funds 
left by the ironmonger | proved to be a poor one and was 
irrecoverable. It | was irregular in its nature, and, irrespective 



12 

of the fact I that the administrator was a temperance man, he was 
irresponsible I in a fiduciary capacity, but for some reason or 
other | he was irremovable from this position ; nevertheless, his 
irresponsibility caused | him to be regarded as uninfluential in 
his community. _ (139) 

J— K— L. 

The knowledge of jurisprudence Ls most useful in the juris- 
diction | of the court, but a knowledge of journalism does not I 
necessarily effect an entrance into the Kingdom of Heaven. 
1 1 do not know exactly how it occurred, but in January | a yellow 
journal accomplished a journalistic feat of a shady I character, 
without the knowledge of other papers, which largely increased I 
its revenues which were already large, and perhaps larger than I 
those of any paper in the city. The justification for | the story 
was due to the liberty of the press | and some of the language 
used could not be found I in the word of the Lord. (106) 



M. 

The manuscript on the subject of magnetism was prepared 
for | the monthly magazine, and the manufacturer gave a descrip- 
tion of | the wonders of magnetic influence and the manufacture 
of machines | which he said he had manufactured in Germany 
many years | ago. 

A marconigram is a message transmitted through space by | 
a mechanical instrument at a maximun speed of lightning. 
Mr. | Marconi must be credited with the invention. I myself 
do | not know him, nor does he know me, but as I a member of 
the same society I hope we may | arrange a meeting at some 
future time. He has probably I met more people than a mere 
handful, and it is | my earnest wish that not much time shall 
pass before I I see him. An ordinary messenger, although of a 
melancholy I appearance, may be a mathematical genius and 
become a noted I mathematician. 

Methodism in the metropolitan district may have the mis- 
fortune | to be grossly misrepresented, but the ministration of the 
ministry I is so benignant in its nature that it is monstrous I to 
misrepresent this branch of religion, and it should be I considered 



13 

a misdemeanour, the minimum punishment for which should be I 
a union with some monstrosity and an exhibition in a I minstrel 
show. It should be as much a misdemeanour as | for a man to 
mortgage property which he does not | own. (221) 



N. 

The soldier, who was a nonconformist, never failed to pro- 
claim | his adherence to the tenets of nonconformity, and not- 
withstanding his | neglect of business, he did nothing to violate 
his vows, | but, nevertheless, during the next month of November, 
near | the northern boundary of the State, from his natural ten- 
dency, | he neglected a number of the practices which naturally 
belong I to that faith. (63) 

o. 

The original objection to the organisation was somewhat 
clouded in | obscurity, but the observation that the objective 
point of orthodoxy I was the overthrowing of infidelity met with 
favour, and an | orthodox society was organised by a professional 
organiser with the | object of clearing away the obstruction to 
true faith and | to organise society on a higher level, and thus 
eliminate | obstructive elements. 

There is often an opportunity to change the I opinions of oneself, 
and whatever other men may say, we I ought to study ourselves 
over and over again and try | to find out of our own volition 
whether, owing to I their selfishness, we owe anything to our 
neighbour. (108) 

P-Q. 

Parliament performs peculiar functions of a parliamentary 
nature, one peculiarity | of which was to license the performance 
of a passenger | on the Northern Railway who, as a first-class per- 
former on | the trapeze, performed many daring feats which 
other passengers were | unable to perform. 

The plaintiff, who was a phonographer, not I only took phono- 
graphic notes of lectures while standing in a | perpendicular 
position, but he was widely known as a philanthropist | engaged 
in philanthropic works, for which he was even commended | 



14 

from the platform, lie viewed society with a clear perspective. | 
and his philanthropy was a subject of admiration and com- 
mendation. | 

The prerogative of a plenipotentiary is practically to remove 
prejudicial I notions which he encounters in the discharge of 
the duties I of his high office, and whenever practicable in their 
preliminary | stages his practice is to warn opponents who have 
practised I their profession as much as five years that they 
endeavour | to remove prejudice in every practical way. 

The probability is | that a proficient Presbyterian would in all 
probability desire the I preservation of Presbyterianism, and 
his adherence to this desire in I his professional capacity would 
probably be productive of good results, I and it is probable that 
his proficiency would be thus I enhanced. 

The interest of the public in the publication of | the book, a 
prospectus of which had been already advertised, | was published 
far and wide as well as the prospective I profits to be derived 
therefrom. The prospect of the ultimate | success of the project 
was entertained by the publisher and | by a large proportion of 
the citizens, who took a I proportionate interest in the stock of 
the corporation which was I formed to publish the book. The 
stock was proportionately distributed I and the enterprise was 
proficiently advertised, and the duties of | the office were duly 
proportioned to the respective abilities of | the printers. 

One reason why so many people take particular | pleasure in 
acquiring the principles of Phonography is principally the | 
acquisition of a short mode of writing, but quite as I much, 
perhaps, in the fact that it will put them I in a position to 
earn a livelihood. It is questionable I if they should always 
remain phonographers merely. (357) 

R. 

Rather than strive for the reformation of criminals, it would I 
seem to be better that the reformer should endeavour to | reform 
grafting politics in the city, and after that system I has been 
reformed seek the regeneration of imprisoned criminals on | their 
own recognizance, and rather before than after their escape I 
from prison. 



15 

The remarkably clever apprehension of a thief by | a policeman 
in the course of his regular duties was | witnessed in the avenue 
to-day, but the remarkable strength of | the captive caused the 
policeman to relinquish his hold on | the thief, who gave a 
marvellous representation of fleetness of I foot — at least so the 
papers represented the affair — whereupon | the policeman 
remarked that whatever might be his religion or | his religious 
views, he would remember it for all time ; I and after all, the 
booty was not recovered and the | policeman could not even 
remonstrate with him. 

With all due I respect to the Republic, the resignation of the re- 
publican representative | was repugnant to the best interests of the 
party, and | the repugnance thus created was represented by the 
withdrawal by I the citizens of their further support. 

The Rev. William Wilkins, | a respected clergyman of the 
Episcopalian Church and holding a | responsible charge in an 
important City which was in receipt | of a large revenue, recog- 
nising his responsibility, preached to Jews I and Gentiles respec- 
tively a sermon more or less retrospective in | its nature, and 
containing references to the resurrection, which his | respec- 
tive hearers listened to with interest. (246) 

s. 

The satisfaction which a sensible man can ecure from selfish | 
deeds is not clearly understood by a man with a | nature of high 
sensibility and generous instincts, who cannot believe I that any 
satisfactory moral results can be obtained from a | life given to 
selfishness. The fact that sometime in the I future he intends to 
make a large contribution to charity | is no signification that 
he has experienced a change of I heart. 

It is singular that the stranger who wanted to | do something of 
a subjective nature subscribed a round sum | to an enterprise 
relating to the subject of building a | library, for that would be 
of an objective nature, but | one explanation of the matter was 
that he was under | subjection to the will of the President of the 
institution. | 

The subscription received was of a sufficient amount to erect I 
a substantial library building. It was substantially furnished 
by the I citizens, and for a time was used as a substitute | for the 



16 

church which had been destroyed by fire, so | that at times the 
library was turned into a church, | but the sufficiency of the 
building for either purpose was | never questioned. 

The stringency of the money market subjected the I trustees 
of the school to the practice of economy in | their expenditures. 
To the surprise of the citizens the strength | of the bank was 
weakened, and its possible failure was I the subject of the 
town's talk. They were, however, somewhat | surprised by the 
significant remark of a wealthy citizen who | suggested that he 
would advance a hundred thousand dollars if I other citizens 
would raise fifty thousand dollars. They promised to I consider 
the suggestion seriously and make special efforts to raise I the 
amount, and they felt sure that the desired result | could be 
secured in a short time. A few other | sympathetic men of 
means signified their willingness to assist, and I in a united 
spirit the bank was saved. The president | of the bank, 
who lived in a southern part of I the town, desired to speak 
specially to his public spirited | neighbours, and sent for them 
to meet him at the I Town Hall. He complimented them and 
thanked them, and said | their action reminded him of the remark 
of the Saviour | in Holy Scripture, " Whatsoever thy hand 
findeth to do, do | it with thy might." (384) 

T. 

The thankful parishioners, who were friends of the minister, 
met | together in the tabernacle for their Thanksgiving service. 
During that | service a telegraphic message was received by the 
minister in | the shape of a night telegram, telling him that the | 
Board of Trade had passed a resolution thanking him for | what 
he had done for them in presenting the truth I on two occasions. 
The minister read this to those who I were assembled in the taber- 
nacle with him, and they all I agreed that he was a public spirited 
citizen and a I true friend, and they would thenceforward 
try through all his I ministry to help him in his work. He 
proceeded to I tell them how much he appreciated their kind- 
ness. The subject | of transubstantiation, in regard to which 
they held dissimilar views, I was referred to a tribunal for inves- 
tigation. It was then | getting towards twelve o'clock, and the 
minister therefore dismissed them I with his blessing, and thus 
ended a very satisfactory meeting. | (160) 



17 

U-V. 

The bill, although generally considered unconstitutional, 
was passed unanimously, and I by the unanimous consent of 
all who understood the question, | the resolution of the House 
was read and passed. Many | could not understand the unex- 
ampled uniformity with which it was | acted upon. The Senate 
unexpectedly voted it down as it | was believed to have been 
unconstitutionally passed by the House | but, as is often the 
case, the unexpected happened. 

The | unquestionable character of the place was uniformly 
accepted. The uniform | consideration of the uninteresting 
question by the members of the | club in an unselfish spirit was 
unquestionably a criterion of | the unselfishness of the members. 
The lack of uniformity by | an uninfluential body of men on a 
simple question of | benefit to the people in general, indicated 
that their deliberations | were unsatisfactory and unsubstantial. 

The practice of eating nothing but | vegetables is called 
vegetarianism, and one who abstains from eating I meat is a 
vegetarian. If vegetarianism were a universal practice | it would 
in a very short time reduce the price I of beef. The majority 
of people, of course, are unsympathetic | concerning the custom, 
and the universality of vegetarianism will probably I never be 
brought about. There are some students in the | university 
who believe that the universe was created for their | special 
benefit, but they are doubtless unprincipled, although some of | 
the students are \ipright citizens and believe in Fniversalism, 
and | some of them place a very high valuation upon the I 
doctrine of that creed. (244) 

W-Y. 

Whensoever a question of a philosophic nature arises, phil- 
osophers should | endeavour to explain it whereinsoever they 
may differ or wheresoever | it may arise, or whithersoever it 
may lead. Young men | and youths, as well as old philosophers, 
should philosophise on I such questions year in and year out, 
even though they | may be a yard apart or miles apart in their | 
understanding of the subject. (64) 



3— <73) 



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\X . 7 > ..,, > ^r t _ ^ G ^ > v 

^ ~- > \^ ' v ~^> ^ ^ -^ V^ 

^ . N . ; mc , o ^ dAs v Zl ■ ^ ^n- 

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28 

T. 

' '-}-. ->. t <L^ 1 5.. * 1 s r\ ^ *-» -\_. , ... 

► ^ . ^: > ■**. a - ^ -7 < •*■ k ..^ 

U-V. 

. v-,1. /i ^f, ) s s~, -S. x— l • » , 

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v v, ^ ") v^ / -y - a. 



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\ 



Grammalogues and Contractions 



Grammalogues 

PHONETICALLY ARRANGED 



Consonants. 
\ 1 happy, 2 up, 3 put 
\ 1 happen, 2 upon 
^ 1 happened 
\ 1 apply, 3 people 
*\ 3 principle, principal-ly 
<\ 1 particular, 2 opportu- 
% 1 approve [nity 

°\, 1 surprise 
\ 1 surprised 

\ 1 by, buy, 2 be, 3 to be 

V, 2 subject-ed 

\ 2 subjective 

S 2 subjection 

\, 1 behalf, 2 above 

\ 2 been 

\ 2 able, 3 belief, believe-d 

% 1 balance 

^> 1 balances 

\ 1 balanced 

^ 2 build-in g 

\ 1 liberty, 2 member, 

remember-ed, 3 number-ed 

| 1 at, 2 it, 3 out 

L 3 itself 

I 1 2 tell, 3 till 

p 2 told 

1 1 try, 2 truth, 3 true 

1 1 tried, 2 trade, % 2 towards 



| 1 had, 2 do, 3 different- 

• 2 did [-ence 

I 1 advantage, 3 difficult 

J 2 done, 3 down 

f 2 deliver-ed-y 

j 2 deliverance 

1 I Dr. 2 dear, 3 during 1 



/ 1 much, 2 which 3 each 

/> 1 child 

/ 3 children 

/ 2 chair, 3 cheer 

; 1 chaired, 2 cheei'ed 

/ 1 large 
f 2 suggest-ed 
/ 2 suggestion 
t 2 suggestive 



/ 3 religious 

/ 2 justification 

J 2 general-ly, 3 religion 

J 2 generalization 

J 1 gentleman, 2 gentlemen 

f 1 largely 

/ 1 larger, 2 journal 

(, 2 generation 

— 1 can, 2 come 
- 1 quite, 2 could 
— » 1 because 
-a I cannot 
<^_ 1 call, 2 equal- ly 
*- 1 called, 2 cold, equalled 
c- 1 Christian, Christianity 

2 care 

=- 1 accord-ing. cart. 2 cared 

_ 1 go, ago, 2 give-n 
«_ 2 gold 

c- 1 guard, 2 great 
*- 2 greatest 

^ 1 half, 2 if 

Vo 1 often, 2 Phonography 

^2for 

^ 2 from 

V^ 2 have 

^ 2 heaven 

^_ 1 over, 2 ever-y, 3 however 

"> 2 very 

C_ 1 valuation, 3 evil 

( 1 thank-ed, 2 think, 

3 youth 

) 3 through, threw 
<) 2 third 

( 1 though 2 them, they 
< 1 that, 2 without 
(, 1 those, thyself, 2 this, 
3 thus, these, youths 
(> 2 themselves 
(, 3 within 
( 2 southern 
( 2 other 
") 2 there, their 
'S 3 therefore 



32 



3 

° 1 has, as, 2 his, is 

) 1 saw, 2 so, us, 3 see, sea 

2 first 

\ 2 special-ly, 3 speak 

°s 2 spirit 

t 2 satisfaction 

1 2 circumstance 
Jf 2 circumstances 
1 2 strength 

t 2 instiiiction 

f 2 instructive 
0— 1 Scripture 
a- 2 secret 
«_ 2 school 
e- 2 scliooled 
«— 1 inscribe- d 
+=> 1 inscription 
*— 1 siemify-ied-ficant 
a-o 1 signi ticarice 
a-s 1 signification 
^_ 2 several, Saviour 
^ 1 sent 
<j^ 2 somewhat 


3 

^v 1 important-ance, 

2 improve-ed-ment 

•-b 1 impossible, 2 improves- 
ments 

*■> 1 more, remark-ed, 2 Mr. 
mere 


^,1 in,any,2no,know,3own 

v_p 1 influence 

^> 1 influenced, 2 next 

« 1 not 

^ 1 hand, 2 under 

^s> I information 

o 2 opinion 

<^- 1 nor, 2 near 

^ 1 northern 


w l language, owing, 
2 thing, 3 young 

r 2 Lord 

x" 2 are, 3 our, hour 
^ 3 ourselves 
^^\ rather, writer 
"A 1 or, 2 your, 3 year 
^ 1 yard, 2 word 


) 2 was, 3 whose 


^ 1 shall, shalt, 3 wish 
J 2 selfish-ness 
J) 2 initial-ly-ed 
J 3 sure 
•? 1 short 


• 2 we, way 
<^2 one 

e^-^2 wonderf ul-ly 
C 2 will 

O' 2 whether, 3 whither 
C 1 while 

s> 2 yes 


_J 2 usual-ly 
) 2 pleasure 


r-s 1 me, my, 2 him, may 

1 met, 2 meeting 
t> 1 myself, 2 himself 
.-^> l most, 2 must 


7 i hiffh 
d^ 2 holy 
o^ 2 house 


Vowels. 

Dots, a, an, . the, ah ! . aye, eh ? 

\ i / 
Dashes. of, on, and, 

SI / 
all, 0, oh ! owe, awe, onsrht, 

u i. , ,i [aught 
\ to, I but, / should L " 

\ two, too, • who. 


Diphthongs. 

I, eye, ay (yes), a how, 

C 3 

with, c when, what, 3 would, 
beyond, i you. 



Grammalogues. 




V 



balance 
balanced 
balances 
\... be 

» because 

been 
behalf 
.5y„. belief-ve-d 

„Z beyond 

.._^_. build-ing 
—J... but 



...V.. buy 

N by 

c 

----- call 

called 

" -' can 

" cannot 

— c-rr — care 

— ="— • cared 

cart 

..../..„ chair 

9 
- chaired 

-—/■■- cheer 

_../.... cheered 

.../!.... child 

.../'.... children 

- Christian-ity 

— d circumstance 
—-0- circumstances 

— c — cold 
come 

... J... constitutionally 

.. could 



D 

..I .. dear 

..I deliver-ed-y 

.J.... deliverance 

..J difference-t 

. I .... difficult 

I do 



-...!.... doctor, Dr. 

...J.... done 

...J.... down 

...A... during 



-/... 


each 
eh? 


x 


equal-ly 


«_ . 


equalled 


.L... 


ever-y 


V 


evil 
eye 



... /?.... first 
...5L... for 
...V.. from 



G 

-J... general-ly 

</ generalization 

.O— generation 

y 

—.'"_. gentleman 

./ gentlemen 

__... give-n 

ZL. go 

.c_... gold 

e-... great 

^a greatest 

^1.. guard 



34 



35 



H 

...)..- had 

....S,.. half 

hand 

~" happen 

happened 

...X- happy 
has 

V have 

... I - he 

V>... heaven 

...Z... high 

..^— ^... him 

.^-t> himself 

...c... his 

_rf^.. holy 

__^< hour 

...<Z^.. house 

....a how 

_..\^.. however 



I 

I 

Jk if 

importance-ant 

-r ^° impossible 

— ^*^ -- improve-d-ment 

■ ■■S*h- iinproves-meiits 

in 

s 3 

influence 

influenced 

"^> , . 
information 

/ initial-ly-ed 

inscribe-d 

_i...... inscription 

„..U ... instruction 

....t... instructive 

...o... is 

_.l it 

. I itself 



./..— journal 
../... justification 



K 

know 



L 

language 

.../ — large 

..../.. largely 

.../... ] ar g,. r 

liberty 

_X_ Lo r d 



M 

-""""V- may 

me 

...^.... meeting 

....X— member 

..*~^~ mere 

...^.... met 

more 

_- most 

-«r-^._ Ikfr. 

-../..._ much 

.-^a.. must 

..^... my 

..^?... myself 



N 

.s_^.. near 
..^-<s?... next 



northern 



v 



not 
number-ed 



O ! oh ! 

of 

often 

I 
on 

</'... one 

.%_?... opinion 

...TV... opportunity 

3™. or 

,...\.... other 

ought 

"j^. • our 

„ > s?r.. ourselves 

nd— out 

over 

l 

- owe 

owing 

■ ^-~,— own 



\ 



- particular 

— -%j — people 

..:sa_., phonography 

_--/.... pleasure 

..t\^.... principal-ly 

..Ts^... principle 

\- Put 



quite 



/ 



rather 
religion 



36 



.-../■• religious 
_!?!„.. remark-ed 
,_\ remember-ed 



s 

p 

--*•-- satisfaction 

...V Saviour 

- saw 

..<2 school 

...h schooled 

Scripture 

....^.... sea 

V — see 

/.... selfish-ness 

sent 

..V_... several 

/.. shall, shalt 

.A..... short 

... /..... should 

significance 

- significant 

.i.~ signification 

signify-ied 

... ) .._ so 

,.<j-v_ somewhat 

...C- southern 

„$._ speak 

..!\ ._ special-ly 

../N..- spirit 

...J strength 

_!x._ subject-ed 

_.^S._ subjection 

..!>».... subjective 

...../?._ suggest-ed 

..-*/*.. suggestion 

.. &!._ suggestive 

...J)..... sure 

..„!*•„. surprise 

._?!* surprised 



T 

....P.... tell 

>.... thank-ed 

L- that 

the 

....)... their 

...A... them 

... A_> ... themselves 

_.../.... there 

_...).... therefore 

.../•■• these 

....(.... they 

...v^... thing 

(..... think 

„...').... third 

...\> ... this 

......... those 

...\ though 

._.V... threw 

_S\ through 

..../ thus 

...p. thyself 

.....J"... till 

...v. to 

_.\.... to be 

....P.... told 

...\ too 

...t.... towards 

...1.... trade 

...? tried 

1 true 

1 _ truth 
]... try 



u 

under 
>• — 

N_ up 



\ 



upon 



....).... 


us 


.J.. 


usual-ly 




V 


^_ 


valuation 


^.. 


very 




w 


... >.... 


was 


... *s... 


way 


..«/... 


we 


■> 


what 


_ c 


when 


_c<£. 


whether 


/ 


which 


...£_ 


while 


<?*- 


whither 


..... / 


who 


....). 


whose 


L 


why 


„<c 


will 


..J... 


wish 




with 


...(.... 


within 


...< 


wit In >ut 


*y 


wouderful-ly 


...TV... 


word 


... > .„. 


would 


<i^Tl 


writer 



...S.... 


ye 




year 
yes 


.-~~. 


you 


..TV... 


young 
your 


-(•■- 


youth 


-c 


youths 



Contractions. 



abandonment 

abstraction 

abstractive 

acknowledge 

acknowledged 

acknowledgmen t 

administrate 

administration 

administrative 

administrator 

administratrix 

advertise-d-ment 

agriculture-al 

altogether 

amalgamate 

amalgamation 

antagonist-ic- 

ism 
anything 

applicablc-ility 

appointment 

arbitrament 

arbitrary 

arbitrate 

arbitration 

arbitrator 

archbishop 

architect-ure-al 

aristocracy-atic 

assignment 

astonish-ed- 

ment 
atonement 
attainment 
auspicious 



B 

\_* bankruptcy 

V baptize-d-st- 

"" \" ~" ism 
-S^^...... benevolent-ce 

X^^— - benignant-ity 

— \t~ bondservant 

.. , jj— ^ bondsman 

c 

\ cabinet 

V>_ Calvinism 

,..._S capable 

.^._._ captain 

(, catholic 

o^v _ certificate 

T. character 

, characteristic 

X.) circumstantial 

commercial 

. .1^ m contentment 

contingency 

con trovers y-ial 

V. covenant 

e— ° — cross-examina- 

^ - tion 

. cross-examine-d 

D 

L danger 

' [ dangerous 

I - S _ defective 
\J deficient-cy 
degeneration 

37 



V— .: 

■ ■■ ' delinquency 

- •■ -' delinquent 

— ■*"** •— democracy-atic 

• 1""""% — demonstrate 

• -■■ l^ - * demonstration 

..if denomination-al 

ip_^ denominational- 
_M£!Ijt — ism 

k^- — depreciate-d 

k /.... depreciatory 

\j — description 

i destruction 

..q destructive 

destructively 

dethronement 

....._ I difficulty 

I dignify-ied-ty 

l^-— dilapidate-d-ion 

"""" ^o^" — disappointment 

-Jo discharge-d 

Lp m disinterested- 
• '" ness 

n „ displeasure 

... i\. _ disproportion-ed 

.. (K-- . disproportionate 

(fVh/.. disrespect 

■ oV disrespectful 

... <r~s. dissimilar 

-...orf. distinguish-ed 

... ..Ii doctrine 



A ecclesiastic-al 

N '. efficient-cy 

L_ ... electric 



38 



>~i L 

„_^..._ 

...^ 

_J± 

±1 






be 



131 



.3 



- electrical 

- electricity 
. emergency 
. England 

English 

■ Englishman 
. enlarge 

■ enlarged 
enlargement 

. enlarger 

■ enlightenment 

entertainment 

enthusiastic-iasn 
Episcopal-ian- 

ism 
especial 

esquire 
establish-ed- 

ment 
evangelical 
everything 
exchange-d 
executive 
executor 
execntrix 
expect-ed 
expediency 
expenditure 
expensive 
extemporaneous 
extinguish -ed 
extraordinary 

extravagant- 
ance 



....V. falsification 

..V^S— v familiar-ity 

_.^--s. familiarization 

S— ^^v^..— familiarize 

v February 

_..V>_^ financial 



V 



G 

^overn-ed 
Government 




H 

t^T— TTTV — henceforth 

f-^S^s.. henceforward 
..oV- — howsoever 

I 

.... )f identical 

immediate 
imperfect-ion 
imperturbable 
impracticable 
impregnable 
improbable-ility 
T7t£_p..^... incandescence 

."^\y incandescent 

incapable 

■-. .TrrP" inconsiderate 

....^fc. inconvenience-t 

s ^ iir _ incorporated 

"^V indefatigable 

v "'\' _ independeut-ce 
.."^L x— indescribable 
indignant-ion 
1 1 s ~^ indiscriminate 

^-j, indispensable 

... .^~ _ individual 
^\~y. .._ inefficient-cy 
_ influential 
inform-ed 
informer 
insignificance 
insignificant 

...^\ inspect-ed-ion 

insubordinate- 
ion 




™X_X._ insufficient-cy 

.... aS insurance 

o7 intelligence 

... V intelligent 

....*f. intelligible 

...I interest 

. . n interested 

. ?TL introduction 

investigatir.n 
investment 
iJ^V-w' ... ironmonger 
" N \__ a irrecoverable 

" A _ irregular 

..2*\\ irremovable 

.....7\ irrespective 

„.r\ irrespective! \ 
— s~X iiresponsible- 
*,>!=— ility 

J 

/ January 

JL journalism 

7 journalistic 

7 jurisdiction 

L 9 jurisprudence 

K 

^2.. knowledge 

L 

i'1 legislative 

fll„__ legislature 



M 

magnetic-ism 
manufacture-d 





manufacturer 
manuscript 
marconigram 
( mathematical 

(, mathematics 

mathematician 
maximum 
mechanical 
melancholy 

/. messenger 

...rTTTT?. Methodism 

./-v/...?\ .... metropolitan 
•— v^-% .... minimum 

X< ministration 

, T ministry 

Trr.... minstrel 

1 misdemeanour 

.....CSS. misfortune 

.s~!f_\... misrepresent-ed 
monstrosity 



monstrous 
mortgage-d 



.....a 



N 

neglect-ed 
negligence 
never 

...^aL nevertheless 

N=> Nonconformist 

.....s_ Nonconformity 

.s^>s_^. nothing 

...^K! notwithstanding 

„3k» November 

o 

.\ object-ed 

...._.„V._ objection 
.\. ..... objectionable 





39 

~...S objective 

-^> — -• obscurity 

-V" observation 

-..'.\i obstruction 

.Ofc...^..... obstructive 

.... </w.. oneself 

... organization 

._ organize-d 

... organizer 

■■ / \ orthodox-y 



P 

parliamentarian 

parliamentary 
■St passenger 

peculiar-ity 
m?Sr\ perform-ed 

performer 
-S/ Vo .... performs-ance 

— Sr \ perpendicular 

./V'^i perspective 

-n/N»..„ philanthropist 

...SJ._ philantnropy-ic 

— .Na ... • — phonographer 

-Xa — phonographic 

— X^. — platform 

- Vii.v . plenipotentiary 

practicable 

practice 

practisc-d 
— \ prejudice-d-ial 

preliminary 

prerogative 
l*rcsbyterian- 
ism 
ZltfZ preservation 

.../\. probable-ility 

....>v production 

..\_ productive 

..\j^... proflcient-cy 

.....\ _ project-ed 




proportion-ed 
proportionate 
prospect 

....Nq„. prospective 

..VV-° prospectus 

...\. public 

.....X,"- publication 

\^> publish-ed 

publisher 

Q 

\k questionable 

R 

v- 

•~'Z_? ratepayers 

'•■ recognizance 

../. — _ recoverable 

••' — - reform-ed 

•* ^\- — reformation 

■' ^f~^ — reformer 

- / -- regular 

- '\*s — relinquish-ed 

iN remarkable 

....V— h — . remonstrance 

...V-s, remonstrant 

....V— a, remonstrate 

....V- k. removable 

- S \ — represent-ed 

- / \i representation 

.. / >» — representative 

reproduction 
S \ — reproductive 
republic 
republican 
repugnancc-ant 
resignation 

■ ■/\. respect-ed 

./(•. respectful 




40 



/\> respective 

'h respectively 

... s\ responsible-ility 

y^. resurrection 

^<k- retrospect 

'<L retrospection 

^<L- - retrospective 

/cL- retrospectively 

.-/x>-r:... reverend 



s 

f^ ,., satisfactory 

.....rr!x sensible-ility 

...Q^- .... singular 

— <r~N^^ something 

\ stranger 

1^.. stringency 

.7^ — >__ subscribe-d 

...% — d subscription 

.>*> substantial 

.\ / *—^ r sufficient-cy 

J suspect-ed 

...TT^7~7~..._ sympathetic 



T 

- k tabernacle 

. U-v telegram 

I telegraphic 

...A. thankful 

>— - thanksgiving 

thenceforward 

together 

transubstantia- 
tes; tion 

— ..L tribunal 



u 

VT^TTT?^.. unanimity 

ti^T^TZ... unanimous 

.....mJ. unconstitutional 

unexpected 

uniform-ity 

. iiniufluential 

i uninteresting 

. <r ol!._. universal 
«r o I... universality 

,^a~N... Universalisra 

-<5<d universe 





V_ vegetarian 

- -V-, vegetarianism 

W 

— *~- whatever 

*i whenever 

"V "J~~- $"" whensoever 

.CfZ... whereinsoever 

— <^- wheresoever 

— .^.y^-. — whithersoever 



A. 



Y 

yesterday 



ER 

■ 
DALLAc 



IP*** by S,r Isaac /**.,„ *W. ' .■ / . H:-.. 



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